10 Things Garry Winogrand Can Teach You About Street Photography

Tomado de: http://erickimphotography.com/blog/2012/08/20/10-things-garry-winogrand-can-teach-you-about-street-photography/

 “Photos have no narrative content. They only describe light on surface.”  “Photographers mistake the emotion they feel while taking the picture as judgment that the photograph is good.”  “Great photography is always on the edge of failure.”  “Every photograph is a battle of form versus content.”  “I photograph to see what the world looks like in photographs.”  “I like to think of photographing as a two-way act of respect. Respect for the medium, by letting it do what it does best, describe. And respect for the subject, by describing as it is. A photograph must be responsible to both.”  “I don’t have anything to say in any picture. My only interest in photography is to see what something looks like as a photograph. I have no preconceptions.”  “There is no special way a photograph should look.”

“Photos have no narrative content. They only describe light on surface.”

“Photographers mistake the emotion they feel while taking the picture as judgment that the photograph is good.”

“Great photography is always on the edge of failure.”

“Every photograph is a battle of form versus content.”

“I photograph to see what the world looks like in photographs.”

“I like to think of photographing as a two-way act of respect. Respect for the medium, by letting it do what it does best, describe. And respect for the subject, by describing as it is. A photograph must be responsible to both.”

“I don’t have anything to say in any picture. My only interest in photography is to see what something looks like as a photograph. I have no preconceptions.”

“There is no special way a photograph should look.”

“No le creas más que a tu gusto”

Tomado de: http://culto.latercera.com/2018/07/23/le-creas-a-gusto-la-carta-en-donde-sergio-larrain-ensaya-empezar-a-fotografo/

 En 1982, el prestigioso fotógrafo chileno que alguna vez recorrió el mundo con su cámara Leica para inmortalizar personas e instantes únicos, escribió una carta buscando inspirar a su sobrino. Autor de libros como El rectángulos en la mano y Valparaíso, en 1959, y gracias a Henri Cartier-Bresson, Larraín entró como miembro asociado de la notable agencia Magnum, donde publicó buena parte de su obra visual.  El juego es partir a la aventura, como un velero, soltar velas. Ir a Valparaíso, o a Chiloé, por las calles todo el día, vagar y vagar por partes desconocidas, y sentarse cuando uno está cansado bajo un árbol, comprar un plátano o unos panes y así tomar un tren, ir a una parte que a uno le tinque y mirar, dibujar también y mirar. Salirse del mundo conocido, entrar en lo que nunca has visto, dejarse llevar por el gusto, mucho ir de una parte a otra, por donde te vaya tincando. De a poco vas encontrando cosas y te van viniendo imágenes, como apariciones las tomas.  Sigue lo que es tu gusto y nada más. No le creas más que a tu gusto, tú eres la vida y la vida es la que se escoge.   Bueno, con esto tienes para comenzar. Es mucho vagabundeo, estar sentado debajo de un árbol en cualquier parte. Es un andar solo por el universo. Uno nuevamente empieza a mirar, el mundo convencional te pone un biombo, hay que salir de él durante el período de la fotografía.

En 1982, el prestigioso fotógrafo chileno que alguna vez recorrió el mundo con su cámara Leica para inmortalizar personas e instantes únicos, escribió una carta buscando inspirar a su sobrino. Autor de libros como El rectángulos en la mano y Valparaíso, en 1959, y gracias a Henri Cartier-Bresson, Larraín entró como miembro asociado de la notable agencia Magnum, donde publicó buena parte de su obra visual.

El juego es partir a la aventura, como un velero, soltar velas. Ir a Valparaíso, o a Chiloé, por las calles todo el día, vagar y vagar por partes desconocidas, y sentarse cuando uno está cansado bajo un árbol, comprar un plátano o unos panes y así tomar un tren, ir a una parte que a uno le tinque y mirar, dibujar también y mirar. Salirse del mundo conocido, entrar en lo que nunca has visto, dejarse llevar por el gusto, mucho ir de una parte a otra, por donde te vaya tincando. De a poco vas encontrando cosas y te van viniendo imágenes, como apariciones las tomas.

Sigue lo que es tu gusto y nada más. No le creas más que a tu gusto, tú eres la vida y la vida es la que se escoge. 

Bueno, con esto tienes para comenzar. Es mucho vagabundeo, estar sentado debajo de un árbol en cualquier parte. Es un andar solo por el universo. Uno nuevamente empieza a mirar, el mundo convencional te pone un biombo, hay que salir de él durante el período de la fotografía.

STREET AWARDS 2018 FINALIST

 The SPi Street Awards 2018 Winner and Finalists   Sponsored by  Leica Camera   It was an incredible competition this year, with a high standard of submissions from all over the globe. We received entries from 137 countries.  We are delighted to present the work of our winner  Alan Burles  and this year's 21 finalists.  Alan has won a Leica Q, a month long solo show at the Leica Studio S in London, a Billingham Hadley Small Pro camera bag and an Angelo Pelle strap. The 21 finalists have all won Billingham accessories, an Angelo Pelle strap and of course a place in the group exhibition at the Leica Café in London.   We hope you enjoy the work as much as we do, and we will see you again in 2019 for another SPi Street Awards!    The SPi Collective

The SPi Street Awards 2018 Winner and Finalists 

Sponsored by Leica Camera

It was an incredible competition this year, with a high standard of submissions from all over the globe. We received entries from 137 countries.

We are delighted to present the work of our winner Alan Burles and this year's 21 finalists.

Alan has won a Leica Q, a month long solo show at the Leica Studio S in London, a Billingham Hadley Small Pro camera bag and an Angelo Pelle strap. The 21 finalists have all won Billingham accessories, an Angelo Pelle strap and of course a place in the group exhibition at the Leica Café in London. 

We hope you enjoy the work as much as we do, and we will see you again in 2019 for another SPi Street Awards! 

The SPi Collective

LIKHA MAGAZINE

 Vicente Manssur is a photographer and creative writer from Ecuador.  His personnal work is about street sightings, still life and everyday scenarios stuck in a pastel universe. He has a very particular eye for detail and to show us a contemplating world where people are wedged in different states.  His photographs seems to tell a story that will never know, who are they, where they going and what’s their goals.. It’s all about that mystery..

Vicente Manssur is a photographer and creative writer from Ecuador.

His personnal work is about street sightings, still life and everyday scenarios stuck in a pastel universe. He has a very particular eye for detail and to show us a contemplating world where people are wedged in different states.

His photographs seems to tell a story that will never know, who are they, where they going and what’s their goals.. It’s all about that mystery..

BEHIND THE ICONIC PANAMA HAT

 Made for hundreds of years, the Panama hat gained notoriety in the US – and around the world – at the start of the 20th-century, when President Theodore Roosevelt wore one as he inspected the progress of the Panama Canal. By the ‘40s-‘50s, the design had transformed into a style statement, thanks to Hollywood. Gregory Peck, Clark Gable, James Stewart, and then the likes of Robert Redford and Sean Connery wore Panama straw hats in renowned films or on and off set, cementing the design’s gentlemanly appeal.  Fast forward to 2018, and the Panama hat still maintains a sense of mystery, despite being one of the most iconic accessories. Two crucial facts – well-known by experts, those who work in the industry, and some fans of the design – continue to remain largely unknown. The first one is the name, which hints to Panama as a country of origin. In fact, these popular hats are Ecuadorian. More specifically, the authentic Panama straw hat and its finest examples come from the Montecristi area and the small town of Pile.

Made for hundreds of years, the Panama hat gained notoriety in the US – and around the world – at the start of the 20th-century, when President Theodore Roosevelt wore one as he inspected the progress of the Panama Canal. By the ‘40s-‘50s, the design had transformed into a style statement, thanks to Hollywood. Gregory Peck, Clark Gable, James Stewart, and then the likes of Robert Redford and Sean Connery wore Panama straw hats in renowned films or on and off set, cementing the design’s gentlemanly appeal.

Fast forward to 2018, and the Panama hat still maintains a sense of mystery, despite being one of the most iconic accessories. Two crucial facts – well-known by experts, those who work in the industry, and some fans of the design – continue to remain largely unknown. The first one is the name, which hints to Panama as a country of origin. In fact, these popular hats are Ecuadorian. More specifically, the authentic Panama straw hat and its finest examples come from the Montecristi area and the small town of Pile.

PHROOM MAGAZINE

  Vicente Manssur  is a photographer based in Guayaquil, Ecuador.  He works as a creative writer and as a photographer.      “My work is mostly about street sightings, daily life and simple things.     I like to find authentic stories of people or things in everyday scenarios.    There is always something happening.”

Vicente Manssur is a photographer based in Guayaquil, Ecuador.

He works as a creative writer and as a photographer.

 

“My work is mostly about street sightings, daily life and simple things. 

I like to find authentic stories of people or things in everyday scenarios.

There is always something happening.”